Items Tagged: web feeds

The Weird Universe explores a human and natural cosmos that is not only stranger than we imagine, but stranger than we can imagine. The usual suspects are Paul Di Filippo; Alex Boese, curator of the Museum of Hoaxes; and Chuck Shepherd, purveyor of News of the Weird.

Recent posts:

  • The Cartoon that United Morey Amsterdam and Zsa Zsa Gabor
    Get the whole fascinating story at this blog.
  • How to be envied by every boy in town
    Boys' Life - Dec 1916 Little Folks Children's Magazine - Dec 1918 via RETROspect
  • News of the Weird (September 21, 2014)
    News of the Weird Weirdnuz.M389, September 21, 2014 Copyright 2014 by Chuck Shepherd. All rights reserved. Lead Story New Frontiers in American Vacuousness: The WE cable network disclosed in August that it had ordered a nine-episode adaptation of a British series, "Sex Box," in which a couple enters a large opaque chamber on stage and has intercourse. The pair, pre- and post-coitally, are clothed and seated before a panel of probably-D-List celebrities, and will respond to questions and comment on their feelings and techniques (likely enduring praise and criticisms about their “work”). The series will debut sometime in 2015. (However, as the Daily Beast website pointed out, it might also be true that, still, in 2015, even a split-second’s glimpse, on any broadcast-TV show, of a female nipple would create a national scandal.) [The Daily Beast, 8-21-2014] The Entrepreneurial Spirit The "trendy" 25Hours Hotel Bikini Berlin, located adjacent to the Berlin Zoo and offering some of the best views of the city from its floor-to-ceiling windows, has famously positioned the rest rooms of its Monkey Bar in front of the windows, also, and those heeding nature’s call are clearly visible to gawkers. Guests are merely warned, by the Trip Advisor website, and by the hotel itself (with the admonition, "Please be careful. Not only the monkeys are watching.”). [Daily Mail (London), 7-30-2014] London designer Gigi Barker recently unveiled the Skin chair (priced at the equivalent of about $2,500), made of leather but with a "pheromone-impregnated silicone base" that makes it feel (and smell, perhaps) like one is "lounging in the fleshy, comforting folds of a man's belly.” The Skin was scheduled for exhibition this month at the London Design Festival. [Quartz, 7-25-2014] China’s insurance companies offer some of the world’s quirkiest policies, according to a September Reuters dispatch from Hong Kong. People’s Insurance Group, for example, will pay out in case a customer’s children display disappointingly “mischievous and destructive” habits. The Ancheng company offers a policy protecting a customer in case of having his mouth burned eating “hotpot.” Ping An Insurance Group (actually, the world’s second-largest by market value) has recently offered an “accidental pregnancy before honeymoon” policy, and is one of three companies that competed to sell couples compensation in case a marriage is disrupted by a “concubine.” [Reuters via Business Insider, 9-1-2014] Unclear on the Concept New Orleans Juvenile Court Judge Yolanda King, already indicted for falsifying her home address in her 2013 campaign for office, was spotted by a Times-Picayune reporter on August 20th filing three registration papers for the November 4th election in which she swore (under oath) to three different addresses--two of which appeared to be clearly erroneous. Her lawyer told the newspaper that the judge, who was suspended by the Louisiana Supreme Court following her indictment, had merely "misinterpreted" the instructions. [Times-Picayune, 8-21-2014] As part of a nationwide distribution of surplus military equipment, ten Texas school districts eagerly acquired a total of 64 M-16 rifles, 18 M-14s, 25 automatic pistols, and magazines capable of holding 4,500 rounds of ammunition. District officials referred generally to the need to protect against school attacks such as the notorious incidents in Colorado and Connecticut, but a local Houston area police chief, seeking to reassure a nervous public, promised that his equipment would be used only by tactically-trained officers and that, otherwise, would be locked in the department’s armory. A critic of the program told KHOU-TV that statistically, the typical active-shooter school situation lasts 12 minutes, hardly enough time to get to the armory and load up. [KHOU-TV, 9-5-2014] Fine Points of the Law In July, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit in Detroit, ruling on a judicial corruption complaint, managed to describe the actions of a Michigan state judge, “Hon.” Wade McCree, as "often reprehensible"--in that he had been carrying on a romantic affair with a woman involved in a child custody case he was judging. (The woman, of course, received favorable rulings.) However, the Court of Appeals judges told the unlucky father that Judge McCree cannot be sued because judges are generally immune from lawsuit. (Subsequently, Judge McCree was removed from office by the state Supreme Court.) [Detroit Free Press, 7-26-2014] Nick Olivas, 24, is a rare American. At age 14 (an age that, in Arizona, makes him legally incapable of consenting to sex), he fathered a daughter with a 20-year-old woman--paternity that he learned of only two years ago. The mother filed against Olivas for child support that now totals $15,000. Olivas is rare in that most states exempt rape victims from child-support orders--except that, since Olivas never made a police report of the incident, Arizona Child Support Services will not exempt him, and instead has obtained an order garnisheeing his wages at $380 a month. [Arizona Republic, 9-2-2014] According to legal scholars consulted by the Associated Press, it is conceivable that Nicole Diggs, of Yonkers, N.Y., even if convicted of negligent homicide in the upcoming trial in the death of her severely disabled 8-year-old daughter, could nevertheless inherit the remains of the child's $2 million trust fund originally established for her care. Evidence is strong that Diggs had neglected the child's hygiene and diet for stretches at a time and overtrusted her less-caring new husband with the girl's well-being, but New York law uniquely still allows, in principle, a convicted mother to inherit from the child as long as she did not "intentionally" harm her. [Associated Press via MSN.com, 9-1-2014] Least Competent Criminals (1) Clearwater, Fla., police pulled over a "suspicious" car on July 24th and ultimately arrested the driver and his passenger. The back seat was loaded with potted plants--in fact, potted pot plants (i.e., marijuana)--so crowded that the leaves and branches of some plants were sticking out of the car’s windows. (2) Daniel Warn, 28, was arrested in July in Costa Mesa, Calif., and charged with the burglary of an El Pollo Loco restaurant--a caper that was captured on surveillance video. Police were notified later that day when Warn--wearing the same distinctive hat and bright green shirt worn by the burglar--came to the restaurant to order a meal. [WTSP-TV (St. Petersburg), 8-6-2014] [KCBS-TV (Los Angeles), 7-18-2014] Of Course! Jonathan Thomas, 50, was charged with DUI and disorderly conduct in Washington Township, Ind., in August after driving through two backyards one Friday evening and getting his vehicle stuck in the second. Police reported that Thomas “show[ed] his teeth to officers” and later “growled” at hospital security staff. Thomas’s day job is director of the Porter County Animal Shelter. [Times of Northwest Indiana (Valparaiso), 8-4-2014] Just Like the Script: (1) In August, a Bradenton, Fla., deputy sheriff was forced to duplicate a classic scene from “Raiders of the Lost Ark” when he was advanced upon by a menacing-looking, samurai-sword-swinging, 31-year-old man. The deputy, perhaps as nonplussed as Indiana Jones was, shot him dead. (2) Rule Number 9: The 15-year-old granddaughter of Cliven Bundy (the Nevada rancher whose dispute with the federal government caused a notorious standoff in March) told Las Vegas’s KSNV-TV that her dad (Bundy’s son) was withdrawing her from her high school because officials would not allow her to carry a knife on campus. She said her dad has taught his kids (just like “NCIS”’s Leroy Jethro Gibbs) to “always” carry a knife. [Bay News 9 (St. Petersburg), 8-28-2014] [KSNV-TV, 8-28-2014] Undignified Deaths (1) Annual Bunyola “fiestas” on the Spanish island of Mallorca were canceled in September out of respect for an 18-year-old man who fatally hit his head after receiving an electric shock on a lamp post he was leaning against as he urinated at a street corner. (2) A 23-year-old medical student suffered a fatal heart attack in September while perusing a sex magazine as he attempted his fourth sperm donation in a week at a clinic at China’s Wuhan University. (3) A 15-year-old boy driving a “skid loader” on a farm near Lancaster, Pa., suffocated in August when the machine accidentally flipped him directly into a manure pit (the sixth such death locally since 1989, according to the Lancaster Intelligencer-Journal). [The Local (Madrid), 9-1-2014] [Daily Mail (London), 9-12-2014] [Associated Press, 8-9-2014] Thanks This Week to Russell Bell, Craig Cryer, and Terry Young, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.
  • Orange Is the Old Black
    To investigate the conditions in the New York State prison system for women circa 1916, socialist reformer SOCIETY'S MISFITS.
  • Staggering Beauty
    A useless, time-wasting distraction from the site staggeringbeauty.com. (You need to have javascript enabled on your browser to get it to work.)
  • 19,998 And Counting
    This entry is weird only in the fact that it's happened to one of our own through the magic of the internet. The number in the title represents the number of times the photos in this person's on-line offering have been looked at by visitors to either the site itself, Google Maps, or Google Earth. The back story goes something like this: Several years ago I posted a single, simple little photograph of a village lane that could have been constructed a hundred, a thousand, or more years ago. To my surprise, it was, very quickly, viewed hundreds of times and I'm certain there weren't that many inhabitants of that village! A few year later I offered a nice little photo of a freshly painted iron bridge in Southern Georgia. To date, that photo has been views (and hopefully enjoyed) over 1,500 times. Many years ago I held a one-man photo exhibition of my B&W work that was critically acclaimed in a few news papers, inspired at least one budding photographer, and proved that one professor really didn't know everything he thought he did about photography. Oh, yea, and almost 200 people came to see the show. A whole TWO HUNDRED! As of today, I've been able to reach out 19,998 times to people all around the world. What an amazing thing that is both for me, as an artist, and for the person who's seen my offerings and been inspired to visit the places, or been given an opportunity to remember a good time in their life, or to just enjoy the photo for itself. What a rush! If you'd like to view the photos you're most welcome to follow this link. And, if you've got some photos you think people would like to see put them up share the fun.

The Inferior 4+1 is a Livejournal community maintained by Paul, lizhand, Paul Witcover, lucius-t and ljgoldstein.

Recent posts:

  • New Review at LOCUS ONLINE September 17, 2014
    A look at Jay Lake's last book:http://www.locusmag.com/Reviews/2014/09/paul-di-filippo-reviews-jay-lake/
  • Two Good Books September 16, 2014
    Two of my favorite authors, Sarah Waters and Tana French, have books out this month.  Both books go in unexpected directions, and both are filled with delights and surprises.The Waters book, The Paying Guests, is especially good.  It starts slowly, which frustrated me -- I like her for her novels of mystery and suspense and betrayal, and I felt impatient, waiting for the good stuff .  Two women (slowly) fall in love.  They have a few problems -- one of them is married, and, this being the 1920s, they can't admit their relationship to anyone who is not a lesbian herself -- but despite that things seem to go fairly well for a while.  I began to think this was going to be a book like Waters' earlier Tipping the Velvet or The Night Watch, about lesbian relationships and everyday life.  Which is fine, of course, but not what I was reading for.Then, more than halfway through, something happens that turns the whole thing into a Hitchcock movie.  The twist is so far along that I can't say what it is, only that it's one of those plots that makes you wonder what you yourself would do in that situation, how flexible your own moral code is.  The tension ratchets up, the suspense accelerates, and you begin to turn the pages with apprehension, almost fear, hoping that nothing worse is going to happen to the protagonists.I had more problems with French's new mystery, The Secret Place -- but first, the good stuff.  A teenage boy was killed on the grounds of a private girls' school, and his killer was never found.  A year later one of the girls at the school, Holly, goes to the police with a postcard she'd taken from a school bulletin board, a postcard that says, "I know who killed him."The police return to the school and begin asking questions.  It becomes clear that only two groups of girls could have put up the postcard in the time available, Holly's own friends and a clique of mean girls.  The story is told in alternating chapters with different timelines, one showing the events of a year ago and one set in the present, with the police interviewing the students.  The whole thing is plotted out so neatly that we will first learn some fact in the police timeline and then, in the next chapter, see it being played out among the schoolgirls.I loved Holly and her group, their friendship, their almost claustrophobic closeness.  At one point they vow to have nothing to do with the students at the corresponding all-boys' school, and I loved seeing the boys' confusion and frustration at their indifference; the idea that girls might not defer to them had never even crossed their minds.   I liked the two cops who come to question the girls, one of whom wants desperately to join the Murder Squad.  I liked the complex plotting -- as it turns out, pretty much everyone has an idea who killed the boy, most of them wrong, and some of the characters are expending a great deal of energy covering for someone else.The mean girls, though, seem a bit stereotypical.  Maybe it's wildly optimistic of me, but I'd like to think that no one can be that mean all the time, like Joanne, or that stupid all the time, like Orla.But my main problem with the book is that there's a supernatural element.  I'm really sort of embarrassed to admit this -- I like to think I don't divide books down strict genre lines, that I can live with some fantasy in my mystery novels.  There's something about this fantasy, though, that doesn't sit right with me.At one point a boy sends Julia, one of Holly's friends, a photo of his penis.  The girls are so squicked out by this and other schoolboy outrages that they make the vow I mentioned earlier, to have nothing to do with men until they get to college.  There's a sense that something hears this vow -- I got the impression of an ancient, vengeful goddess, but that might be just me.  So far, so good -- I can handle this part.Then, though, the girls become able to do magic.  Simple things, like turning a light on and off or moving a bottle cap.  My problem is that this ability is used as a way to illustrate the girls' closeness, or maybe the goddess's approval, but it isn't at all integrated into the story.  Surely teenagers with these abilities would use them against their enemies, in this case the mean girls.  What would happen if a lightbulb blew out every time Joanne entered a classroom, or if Orla's pens began to move slowly across her desk?  Wouldn't adolescent girls, despite their vows, start experimenting with love spells?  And of course this opens the possibility that the murder might have been a supernatural event -- something that, if it had happened, would have made me throw the book across the room.I guess what I'm saying is that fantasy can't be used as just a symbol.  It's dangerous stuff -- once you allow it in it begins making its own demands.  I wish it hadn't been there -- the story works just as well without it
  • New Review at LOCUS ONLINE September 13, 2014
    The sophomore novel from Messr. Parzybok:http://www.locusmag.com/Reviews/2014/09/paul-di-filippo-reviews-benjamin-parzybok/
  • Me, Matera, and CHASING THE QUEEN OF SASSI September 12, 2014
    In December 2013, I was invited by APT Basilicata, a regional tourist agency of the Italian government, to visit Matera, Italy, with the purpose of getting to know the region and eventually produce a piece of fiction embodying what I had learned. The experience was beyond compare.Matera is a unique town in a gorgeous region of a splendid country. An ancient place known for its cave houses, the city was full of history, culture and lovely people.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MateraI shot literally 1000 photos, but will only display three here.Below you see a model of the city on display for tourists for free.Here's one of the peasant cave dwellings--many of which are now occupied after being beautifully rehabbed to modern standards--set up as a museum.Here's one angle on the structures that climb the hillsides.I was hosted by the brilliant guides Dora and Michele Cappiello of the incomparable firm of Ferula Viaggi.http://www.ferulaviaggi.it/I could write all day about my time in Matera. But instead, I'd like to point you to the story that came out of the experience.Now available as a free download for the Nook:http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/chasing-the-queen-of-sassi-paul-di-filippo/1120315012?ean=9788890786914Now available as a free download for Kindle:http://tinyurl.com/ptafvwsFor Kindle UK readers:http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chasing-Queen-Sassi-Paul-Filippo-ebook/dp/B00L4DHSWU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1410535697&sr=8-1&keywords=chasing+sassiOr on the iTunes library, also for free:I hope you enjoy the tale that was inspired by Matera, and share some of the wonders of that miraculous city.
  • New Review at the B&NR September 10, 2014
    Let's look at Jeff VanderMeer's trilogy:http://www.barnesandnoble.com/review/the-southern-reach-trilogy/
  • New DiFi Interview at AMAZING September 10, 2014
    http://amazingstoriesmag.com/2014/09/55019/